OLD POLICE CARS FOR SALE. CAR FOR SALE IN INDIANA

Old Police Cars For Sale

old police cars for sale

    police cars

  • (police car) cruiser: a car in which policemen cruise the streets; equipped with radiotelephonic communications to headquarters
  • A police car is the description for a vehicle used by police, to assist with their duties in patrolling and responding to incidents.
  • (Police car (slang)) Black and white is an American slang term for a police car that is painted in large panels of black and white or generally any “marked” police car.

    for sale

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  • For Sale is a tour EP by Say Anything. It contains 3 songs from …Is a Real Boy and 2 additional b-sides that were left off the album.
  • For Sale is the fifth album by German pop band Fool’s Garden, released in 2000.

Goodbye to an old friend :-(

Goodbye to an old friend :-(
One Last Climb Before Giant’s Big Move
Sculpture Headed For Pr. George’s

By V. Dion Haynes
Washington Post Staff Writer

On May 14, 1994, Matthew Jones and Julie Allen-Jones were married in a furtive ceremony in front of "The Awakening" sculpture at Hains Point in Southwest Washington. They didn’t have permission from the National Park Service, Jones said, "and we were afraid the police were going to kick us off."

Yesterday, the Alexandria couple returned to reminisce about their wedding day and to say goodbye to the silver-colored giant — its leg, foot, hand and bearded face seeming to burst from the ground. The sculpture will be moved Wednesday from its home of nearly 28 years at East Potomac Park to a spot in Prince George’s County.

Like many others visiting the site, the Joneses expressed sorrow that the work by J. Seward Johnson Jr. will no longer grace the picturesque park on the Potomac River but said they were glad it isn’t going too far.

The two pointed to where they stood on their wedding day, near the leg. "The judge played the violin," recalled Jones, 42. Forty-five guests were gathered. "I remembered the cops coming over. . . . I had heart flutter. He just let us go."

"It was such a beautiful day," said Allen-Jones, 37. "We haven’t been here in 14 years."

"We’ll have to visit it," Jones said.

Last year, the owner of the sculpture sold it to the developers of National Harbor, a glitzy convention center complex slated to open in April farther south along the Potomac in Prince George’s. The sculpture will be reinstalled there Wednesday. According to the Park Service, it had been for sale the duration of its time at Hains Point.

The sculpture is 17 feet tall at its highest point — the fingers of the right arm — and 70 feet across. The five-piece creation is the largest work by Johnson, known for statues of people doing day-to-day activities. "The Awakening" has drawn thousands of visitors since it was installed in June 1980.

Yesterday, Frank and Kelli Pilewski of Vienna took pictures of their children, Paige, 7, and Owen, 10, climbing on the giant’s leg.

"I think it’s cool the way the leg is smooth from all the kids climbing on it," said Frank Pilewski, 42.

"It’s pretty," said Kelli Pilewski, 40. "You see the city all around you."

Dan Hoke, 54, of Northern Virginia said he often admired the sculpture while riding his bike around Hains Point. He said the spot won’t be the same without the giant.

The relocation "is a bummer," Hoke said. "Without it, this part of Hains Point will not be a draw. It’s sad we’re going to lose it."

Ken Kealy of Alexandria took his 7-year-old twins, Richmond and Trenton, to see the giant. "I used to ride my bicycle here," said Kealy, 50. "I was explaining to the boys that a car hit the head twice."

"The Awakening," he said, was a landmark he had always looked for when he was flying to and from nearby Reagan National Airport. He said he told his sons about a time the area flooded. "The water was so high, the only thing you could see was the kneecap."

"It looks like a real person who has been in the ground since 800 B.C.," Trenton said.

"I just wanted them to see it once before it moved," Kealy said, as the boys climbed in and out of the giant’s mouth.

John Crouch, 40, of Arlington County said he decided to take his two sons, Jack, 4, and Griffin, 2, for their first visit after learning about the relocation. He recounted his boyhood times there.

"I came here with a school group once or twice. They were science field trips. I saw it with my fifth- and sixth-grade classes," Crouch said. "I have a lot of affection for it."

"I feel bad I didn’t take them down until now," he added.

Jessyca Stansbury-McCargo came from Columbia with her photo club to shoot the sculpture.

"I really like it rising from the dust — a new beginning, a new birth," she said.

Staff writer Anita Huslin contributed to this report

I Am The Law

I Am The Law
I’m still young and foolish enough that I chose to stand outside, taking pictures and having nice conversations with the policeman and other people instead of being warm and alone in the car. It was 15 degrees and dammit, it really felt it.

The police presence represents a Sensible Idea more than anything else. I don’t think anyone’s ever thought "Hey…dozens of geeks with cash are all alone in a secluded parking lot; seems like easy pickin’s" And I don’t think any of the people waiting have ever had it occur to them that what with the darkness and the seclusion, they might be able to help themselves to a considerably steeper discount than what the store had intended.

No, it just seems like the sort of situation where hiring a special detail for four or five hours makes sense, that’s all.

Which is not to say that he doesn’t come in handy. We must face a sad truth about our Tribe: we Geeks have our share of wingnuts and we’ve got plenty of people who might have developed the industry’s best-selling network analysis app, but never got around to developing a fully-functional suite of social software.

There was the year, for example, when we got six inches of snow overnight. And (good God) someone decided to ride their bike to the sale. Leaving aside the question of how he intended to get his purchases home, how did he intended to survive out in the elements overnight?

I weighed the chances of getting knifed to death against the chances that I’d have to explain to a reporter from Channel 5 (HQ: right across the street) why I allowed someone to freeze to death ten feet away from my warm and cozy car, and let the poor fool inside.

This year, the wingnut faction was represented by a very early-arriver who brought a hairtrigger paranoia with him. I think I was freaking him out by hanging out near the entrance nearly since the moment I’d arrived. Clearly! I was trying to jump the line.

I wasn’t there when it happened, but I was told that he confronted the cop, angrily asking if he intended to enforce order. And he asked in such a charming fashion that the nice officer told him to get back in his car and stay there.

So the answer to his question was clearly "Yes."

The policeman was indeed very, very nice. And he looked almost exactly like Patton Oswalt, if the comic were about a foot taller, ten years older, and could wear a gun holster in a non-ironic context.

The wide swath of personalities and people is always a happy aspect of any geek event. I was pleased to encounter many of the exact same people I used to see here every year.

"So where’s the older guy who I always used to see you with?" I asked one familiar face, and that’s when I learned that (a) it was a bit too too cold for him so he begged off, and (b) oh, he invented the Bose Wave radio. So now I know lots about how the thing was designed…including how much each of these units costs Bose to produce.

(Holy cats. "Bose Wave Radio" has now replaced "bottled water" as my benchmark for ungodly markups.)

old police cars for sale